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How I turned my loss into light with one simple change.| The story of why I create cremation art.

Did you ever imagine that your life would take a direction that you never expected? That is precisely what happened to me in 2020 when my husband and I lost someone close to us. Losing my soon-to-be mother-in-law was heartbreaking and it left me feeling confused about how fragile life can be. But then, in a surprising moment of grace and insight, I realized something unexpected: there can be beauty- even in our deepest sorrows.


This realization sent me on an incredible journey of discovery and led to a greater understanding of how we can transform even our most painful experiences into moments of joy. Here is the story of how I changed my loss into light with one simple change - cremation art; a deeply meaningful way for families to grieve together and celebrate the living legacy of their loved ones through artwork..



-Mike and I filmed an unofficial wedding ceremony- vows and all-

in our living room with an actual wedding commissioner in 2020. The video was for Mike's mother before she passed.


At first, I was overwhelmed with grief and disbelief. When the shock of my mother-in-law's death began to subside, however, I found myself drawn to a new idea: create an artwork out of her ashes. This was unheard of, but it felt like the perfect way to honor her life and keep her memory alive-an urn alternative that was as beautiful and expansive as she was. I was lucky enough to find books and in-depth studies on primitive paint making and this would be the first step in creating Celebration of life keepsakes.



After a year of perfecting my technique with stone crushing and turning them into archival paints, I discovered a calling all my own.



-The crushed stones go through a refining process by hand with mortar and pestle to create an archival earth-tone paint. Using a glass muller

( shown above ) the stones become smooth as honey.

I then set out to collect rocks from various places that she loved and these stones would be the perfect personalized touch to create a memorial as unique as her.

The cremated remains were then mindfully added to the stone paint and became one with the natural colors and salts of the earth. As ashes to ashes, dust to dust come to a full circle it was then painted on timeless natural linen. Together my husband and I created a beautiful piece of artwork that perfectly captured the essence of her spirit.

The experience was incredibly powerful and transformative, and I realized how important it is for families to have a meaningful way to grieve and remember their lost loved ones. From this experience, I have been able to help others create their own unique memorials of love and remembrance for loved ones and pets.


My experience with cremation artwork has taught me one thing above all else: that our greatest losses can also be our greatest gifts. Even in the darkest of times, we can use creativity and connection to find healing and hope.

I believe every life is a masterpiece and every life should be celebrated. It is my sincerest wish that others will find comfort in this gesture of honor and celebration, and together, we will find healing and peace in the same way that I did--by turning pain into something beautiful.



-Happily painting In my Studio In Whistler, British Columbia, Canada.

Today, I'm proud to be able to offer this service to those who have experienced loss so the legacy of their loved ones and pets stays alive through beautiful art.

Thank you for being here and allowing me to share my story.

With love and appreciation,



Jenna Jones


Jenna Jones is a Canadian abstract artist and is the founder of HÉRITAGE Memorial Fine art. A service providing families with an opportunity to create beautiful, meaningful keepsakes for cremated loved ones and pets.


To learn more, visit her website and subscribe to be the first to see her New Original Art collections. https://www.jennajonesart.com/

or follow her on Instagram https://www.instagram.com/iamjennajones/



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